2005 – Evidence-Based Practice: Appraising Research Studies

Intermediate / Lecture

 

Sanibel, FL / Wednesday, June 20, 2018 – 7:45-11:00 am – 3.0 credit hours

(Classroom: 7:45-11:00 am)

 

Faculty: David Berry, PhD, AT, ATC, ATRIC_

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Best practice treatment decisions require the integration of external and internal information and patient factors/expectations. External information is obtained by accessing the best available evidence from the medical literature concerning the clinical situation/question at hand. Internal information includes consideration of such local factors as the aquatic professional’s personal experience and skills, knowledge of the available equipment, and support personnel. Finally, and perhaps most importantly is the inclusion of the patient’s preferences in a collaborative model is essential, because different patients assign unique priorities to complications and outcomes. Evidence-based practice (EBP) provides aquatic professionals with the tools for finding the evidence and analyzing the quality of that evidence so they can benefit from the work of other clinicians described in the literature.

 

Evidence-based practice involves the explicit incorporation of evidence from three sources: (1) research evidence; (2) clinician knowledge, experience, and judgment; and (3) patient preferences. Practitioners may be fortunate and find a pre-appraised article where another person already completed the critical appraisal, such as the case with a synopsis from an evidence-based journal. If a practitioner cannot find that, it will be necessary to assess the evidence themselves. This process is known as critical appraisal. Practitioners are judging the quality of the study methods and if the study can be applicable to their own situation, whether the situation involves a population, an individual patient, a policy or yourself. You are trying to answer the question: “Were the methods used in this study good enough that I can be confident in the findings? In this course, practitioners develop skills to effectively access, appraise, and apply intervention research evidence in decision making for clinical practice. Emphasis is on research evidence from primary quantitative research about aquatic interventions.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)  Value and understand the role of critically appraising the results and quality of an intervention research study, specifically those related to aquatic therapy.

2)  Value and understand how to measure the reliability of research measures of an intervention research study, specifically those related to aquatic therapy.

3)  Value and understand the reasons to use basic statistics used in intervention research studies, specifically those related to aquatic therapy.

4)  Value and understand the different types of basic statistics used in intervention research studies, specifically those related to aquatic therapy.

5)  Value and apply aquatic therapy intervention research study results to improve patient outcomes.

 

FACULTY: David C. Berry, PhD, AT, ATC, ATRIC, is a Professor, Athletic Training Program Director at SVSU, and author (Emergency Trauma Management for Athletic Trainers). He serves as an active member of the Board of Certification, American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Committee, and the Sports Education Council (Michigan Cardiovascular Institute) educating the community and professionals on emergency planning and sudden cardiac awareness.