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3211 – Principles of Strength and Conditioning

Advanced / Land Workshop
Chicago, IL / Friday, November 13, 2020 – 1:30-5:00 pm – 3.5 credit hours
(Classroom: 1:30-5:00 pm)

Faculty: David Berry, PhD, AT, ATC, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Physically active patients recovering from an injury or surgery can stay fit by doing water-based strengthening, stretching, proprioceptive, and sport-specific exercises. For the physically active individual, the specificity of training is an essential element to maximizing the application of fitness. Physically active individuals who participate in sports and activities could benefit from the aquatic environment. Athletic and personal training in the aquatic environment is one of the most stringent activities a person can engage in if it is done correctly.

The aquatic environment is not just for rehabilitation. It is also a viable option for fitness training for persons of all ages and abilities. Aquatic training and conditioning is an optional medium to traditional, land-based training, and it opens people up to a variety of new exercises to enhance performance and improve quality of life. The aquatic environment provides support and resistance and allows people to engage in different muscle groups by improving overall flexibility and strength. A well-crafted aquatic training or strengthening program can improve cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, strength, and balance and coordination. It reduces the perception of pain and decreases the risk of injury and finally improves the quality of life. This session will examine the current scientific evidence for, application of and effects of aquatic experience in the adult population to improve fitness and athletic ability.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
1) Overview of the principles of program design in the aquatic environment as it relates to fitness training and conditioning.
2) Understand the importance of general strength training using drag or resistive equipment for all populations – include types available.
3) Examine the current scientific evidence for, application of and effects of aquatic-based training across the spectrum of techniques.
4) Examine the current scientific evidence for, application of and effects of land-based vs. aquatic-based plyometric and running training programs.
5) Examine the current scientific evidence for, application of and effects of aquatic boot camp training.
6) Examine the current scientific evidence for, application of and effects of aquatic high-intensity interval training.
7) Examine the current scientific evidence for, application of and effects of aquatic training and training protocols for the injured patient.

FACULTY: David Berry, PhD, AT, ATC, ATRIC, is a Professor, Athletic Training Program Director at SVSU, and author (Emergency Trauma Management for Athletic Trainers). He serves as an active member of the Board of Certification, American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Committee, and the Sports Education Council (Michigan Cardiovascular Institute) educating the community and professionals on emergency planning and sudden cardiac awareness.