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Orthopedic Education

ATRI Online Ed Information

(SPECIFIC COURSE LISTINGS BELOW)

Fees:

$59 – 1-hour course

$84 – 1.5-hour course

$109 – 2-hour course

$159 – 3-hour course

$199 – 4-hour course

$275 – 6-hour course

$325 - 7-hour course

$375 – 8-hour course

$695 – Specialty Certificate Program (for Course Numbers 1611, 2237, 2311, 2318, 2319 only)

Cancellation:

Once you have accessed the online course there is no refund available. If you cancel in writing within 3 months of purchase and have not accessed the course there is a 75% refund. This cancellation policy applies for all ATRI Online Education. Any cancellation policy you may see in the online registration process does not apply to ATRI Online Education.

Preparation

No preparation is required for the courses. You may take time to review or ‘fast forward’ during the course.

How it works:

After you click below to register and pay for a course:

Your information will be sent to Linda Scott, who will register you on the Online Ed website and e-mail you your username, password and the link for your course. Linda’s e-mail is Lscott255@yahoo.com

  

After you begin taking the course:

You will be able to download and print the course handouts and materials as well as watch the course on your computer.

ATRI faculty members are often available for email questions after the course is completed. You will find their contact information in the course proceedings.

Click Here to Register and Pay for the Online Course(s) of your choice

Orthopedic Course Information

1311 – Vertical Techniques for Lower Extremity Rehab
Beginner / 3-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Connie Jasinskas, MSc

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

The aquatic environment allows the elimination, reduction, or gradual re-introduction of gravity while rehabilitating LE injuries. This workshop will explore specific exercises for LE segments, as well as aquatic protocols to improve balance, core stability and gait. Muscular imbalance related to guarding the injured limb will be addressed. Progressions using open and closed kinetic chain exercises for the lower extremity will be discussed, tried and applied.  Emphasis will be placed on optimizing functional recovery for ADL or sport performance.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1) Define specific aquatic rehabilitation goals for a variety of LE injuries.

2) Experience and practice open and closed kinetic chain aquatic exercises to restore LE ROM, muscular strength and endurance.

3) Experience and practice techniques to restore muscle balance, improve core stability and normalize gait.

4) Explore aquatic tools to assist LE rehab.

5) Practice teaching strategies for optimal program delivery.

6) Evaluate efficacy of LE rehab, adjust goals and progress exercise protocols as required to achieve optimal function.

2016 – Evidence-Based Aquatic Shoulder Rehab
Intermediate / 3-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Janet Gangaway, PT, DPT, OCS, ATC, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Explore the skills necessary to search the scientific literature to support aquatic therapy for treatment of the shoulder. This course will enable the participant to apply the techniques shown to improve shoulder impairments through scientific evidence.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Identify the process of searching PubMed and other search engines for scientific literature.
  2. Locate evidence supporting the use of aquatic therapy for treatment of the shoulder.
  3. Practice techniques in the pool related to the treatment of the shoulder.
2205 – Jumping into Aquatic Plyometrics: An Evidence-Based Approach - NEW!

Intermediate / 2.0 credit hours
(Classroom Viewing Time: 2 hours)

Faculty: David Berry, PhD, AT, ATC, ATRIC 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Land-based plyometrics (LPT) is a popular activity used to improve athletic performance. It is considered a high-intensity conditioning program and consists of explosive exercises that require muscles to adapt rapidly from eccentric to concentric contractions. Research has shown that athletes who use plyometric exercises are better able to increase acceleration, vertical-jump height, leg strength, joint awareness, and overall proprioception. Plyometric programs have also been correlated to musculoskeletal injuries and delayed-onset muscle soreness because of the high-intensity and compression forces on the joints and muscles. However, aquatic plyometric training (APT) may reduce this potential while still improving performance.

Aquatic plyometric training is not a new concept, but it has recently become more popular, mostly because of the potential to decrease injuries compared with land plyometric contractions by decreasing impact forces on the joints. Aquatic settings are beneficial not only for rehabilitation but also for conditioning because of the unique properties of water, specifically, buoyancy and resistance resulting from its viscosity.

With the popularity of aquatic exercise growing in terms of both injury rehabilitation and performance training, many practitioners are transitioning land-based activities to the water. However, many practitioners are adapting land-based plyometric and running training programs to the aquatic environment without examining the evidence. This session will examine the current scientific evidence for, application of and effects of land-based vs. aquatic-based plyometric and running training programs.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
1) Identify the phases of a plyometric training program.
2) Determine the function of a plyometric training program from a land and aquatic based perspective.
3) Assess the goals and benefits of an aquatic plyometric training program vs. a land-based plyometric training program.
4) Examine current scientific evidence to determine the effectiveness and efficacy of land vs. aquatic based plyometric training especially as they are related to patient-oriented and disease-oriented outcomes.
5) Describe how to design and implement an aquatic plyometric training program including training procedures, equipment, and safety concerns.
6) Demonstrate some of the training techniques and procedures that may be utilized.

FACULTY: David C. Berry, PhD, AT, ATC, ATRIC, is a Professor, Athletic Training Program Director at SVSU, and author (Emergency Trauma Management for Athletic Trainers). He serves as an active member of the Board of Certification, American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Committee, and the Sports Education Council (Michigan Cardiovascular Institute) educating the community and professionals on emergency planning and sudden cardiac awareness.

2233 – Post-Procedure Rehab

Intermediate / 3-hour Workshop

Faculty: Mary LaBarre, PT, DPT, ATRIC

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will provide evidence-based research for the evaluation and treatment of individuals following surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures including: ACL repair, meniscus repair, and platelet rich plasma injections.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)  Identify prevalence of orthopedic injuries in various populations.

2)  Examine various types of orthopedic procedures and subsequent rehab protocols.

3)  Explore use of aquatic exercise during rehab after orthopedic procedures.

4)  Provide case studies of orthopedic post-procedure patients where aquatic exercise was incorporated into rehab.

2300 – Lumbar Stabilization for Spinal Fusions

Intermediate / 3-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Mary Wykle, PhD, ATRIC

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Spinal fusion surgery as a result of trauma, tumors, degenerative disorders, and other reasons resulting in low back pain routinely sends patients to aquatic therapy at various stages of rehabilitation. Key in treatment is familiarity with proper protocol progressions based on the levels of fusion. This workshop presents lumbar/pelvic stabilization protocols for basic fusions to multiple-level fusions and appropriate activities for patients with varied physical activity history.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)  Recognize the functional relationship between the spine and peripheral joints and the motion changes throughout the spinal axis.

2)  Assist patient to recognize and maintain lumbar/pelvic neutral.

3)  Identify appropriate strengthening exercises and progressions for the core and the upper extremities, within acceptable range of motion while remaining in neutral position.

4)  Practice and understand the importance of symmetrical diaphragmatic breathing and strengthening of the respiratory musculature in pelvic neutral.

2302 - Shoulder Pathology and Protocols - NEW!

Intermediate / Lecture / 3.0 credit hours

(Classroom Viewing Time: 3 hours)

Faculty: Beth Scalone, PT, DPT, OCS, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The shoulder is a complex joint that relies on muscle balance for stability and functional use of the upper extremity. The aquatic environment is ideal for rehabilitation of various shoulder injuries and recovery from surgery. This lecture will focus on review of various shoulder pathologies linking key points to land and aquatic protocols to assist the aquatic therapist in the clinical decision-making process in patients with shoulder pathology. This course is intended to increase the therapist’s knowledge on the shoulder anatomy and pathology to better understand clinical protocols and exercise progressions.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • Describe key points of shoulder rehabilitation including precautions during rehabilitation phases for various shoulder injuries/surgery including rotator cuff, labrum, impingement syndrome/ sub-acromial decompression, frozen shoulder, and total shoulder replacement.
  • Apply variety of aquatic protocols for shoulder rehabilitation.

FACULTY: Beth Scalone, PT, DPT, OCS, ATRIC, is a licensed physical therapist with many years of experience in orthopedic and aquatic therapy. As the owner of North County Water and Sports Therapy Center in San Diego (www.waterpt.com), she continues with hands-on clinical care in addition to her role as educator. Since graduating from the University of Connecticut in 1991, Beth has belonged to the American Physical Therapy Association and has achieved certification as a Clinical Specialist in Orthopedic Physical Therapy. In January 2006, she graduated from Boston University with a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree. Additional certifications include Certified STOTT Pilates™ instructor and Master Instructor for the Burdenko Method.

Beth not only provides continuing education for health care professionals, she is an adjunct faculty in the San Diego Mesa College PTA program, teaching Orthopedic Rehabilitation and Introduction to Pathology courses. She also provides the learning module/instruction on aquatic therapy to the University of St. Augustine San Diego Campus DPT program. She is the recipient of the 2010 ATRI Tsunami Spirit Award and the 2012 ATRI Professional Award.

2305 – Complex Shoulder Solutions
Intermediate / 3-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Terri Mitchell, BA, PTA, ATRIC

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Whether for strengthening, stabilizing, stretching or relaxing, the various body positions in the water provide several options for treating persons with shoulder injuries in the therapy pool. We will practice positioning different body types in the water with appropriate flotation. Get hands-on experience with PROM, isometric and isotonic exercises for the shoulder and UE for persons with ortho and neuro diagnoses including frozen shoulder, CVA, rotator cuff repair and arthritis. Stretch, stabilize and strengthen shoulders in the pool.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • Examine benefits and limitations of being vertical, prone and supine in the therapeutic pool.
  • Review shoulder diagnoses including frozen shoulder, shoulder impingement, rotator cuff injury and arthritis.
  • Determine the aquatic therapy intervention benefits for shoulder patients.
  • Describe short and long-term goals for various shoulder patients.
  • Gain hands-on experience with various aquatic therapy techniques to use with shoulder patients.

 

 

2306 - Shoulder Stabilization
Intermediate / 3-hour Workshop

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Bring clients into the pool who have shoulder instability to maximize early movement progressing to active full range of motion to work hardening skills. Learn great progressions for your clients. We will discuss both low function and high function, so bring your case histories to present and design a program.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

¨     Provide initial shoulder stabilization activities in the aquatic environment.

¨     Explore variations in exercises, based on client evaluations.

¨     Progress the client to a high intensity shoulder program.

2309 – Trigger Point Patterns for Back Pain

Intermediate / 3-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Shinzo Fujimaki, CMT

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Learn the art of Japanese healing, shiatsu, aikido and gentle yoga in the water for back pain. This self-healing shiatsu yoga is based on meridians (energy line), major acupressure points, five elements from Shiatsu, and gentle stretches with breath from yoga. All combine to create the energetic meditative movement in the warm water. This healing movement opens up the inner energy to circulate the entire body and mind to heal the common illnesses and create the better health.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)   Identify the concept of Oriental healing, the Yin and Yang theory and principles of Shiatsu, Aikido and Yoga.

2)   Identify and locate the general flow of meridians.

3)   Identify and palpate the key acupressure points and explain the benefits.

4)   Return demonstration of the oriental approach to energy flow by using proper breath control, Shiatsu, Yoga, and Aikido techniques.

2311 – Assess, Correct, and Enhance (ACE) Function for Orthopedics Specialty Certificate Program

Intermediate / 15-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Beth Scalone, PT, DPT, OCS, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

There is a three-step process in helping clients achieve the highest function possible. The aquatic therapist needs to be able to assess and apply findings by using clinical reasoning skills to correct muscle imbalances and movement impairments. Completing the rehabilitation picture with developing progressive, integrative programs to enhance function. All three steps are essential in helping the client to reach their goals.

The goal of this course is to enhance critical thinking skills for developing effective and efficient aquatic therapy programs. This course will review common assessments used in orthopedic rehab with common impairments found in orthopedic clients. Linking the findings of these assessments to specific corrective exercise will focus on progressions and functional integrative ideas to complete the rehabilitation process. Research and clinical pearls are combined to help the aquatic therapist chose the best treatment approaches for their client. This course discusses protocol ideas combined with principles and applications for deeper understanding and independent decision making.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)  State the three-step process to maximize a client’s function.

2)  Perform clinical, functional mobility and strength assessments for major joints of the body and spine.

3)  List most common impairments found in clients with orthopedic issues.

4)  Plan treatment interventions in a sequential order to achieve greatest outcomes.

5)  Choose aquatic exercises to correct impairments and improve function based on clinical assessments.

6)  Develop integrative functional aquatic exercise to maximize function.

2312 – Emerging Trends with Aquatic Applications

Intermediate / 3-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Ruth Sova, MS, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Emerging (old and new) techniques and concepts such as Loaded Movement Training (LMT), Corrective Exercise Programming, Myofascial Compression, Slow Motion Walking (SMW), and PNF Stretch are growing quickly in land-based programs. We’ll define them and then show aquatic application for each one. We will review the concepts of LMT and offer exercises using LMT for shoulders/neck and hip/back, and balance deficits. Corrective Exercise Programming will be explained with exercise options for neuro, upper quadrant, and lower back. Myofascial Compression and PNF Stretching will be incorporated into exercises in the Corrective Exercise Program and also as stand-alone exercises. Slow Motion Walking (SMW) will be incorporated into the Corrective Exercise Programming and used for balance with gait.

Corrective Exercise Training is one of the new training concepts that, after assessment, covers three basic components: massage or myofascial release, stretch, and strengthen. We’ll apply the concept to shoulders and give you a specific protocol to use. We’ll give modifications and precautions to allow you to use the protocol with your clients.

Loaded Movement Training is an emerging trend as an effective way to help clients develop total-body strength by training all of the muscles together as one system. Loaded movement training is movement-based resistance training that combines full-body, task-oriented movement patterns with load. Benefits include:

  • Integration of a variety of physiological systems.
  • Lower compressive forces on the joints and skeletal structures of the body.
  • Improving multidirectional stability, mobility, strength and power.

This concept of loaded movement training is supported by a wide variety of evidence from research literature.

Suspension Exercise is a new, versatile exercise for younger and older adults. It requires core activation and stabilization, while increasing upper- and lower-body muscular strength, power and endurance. The physiological mechanisms involved in acute and chronic exercise are not yet explained, but preliminary research describes responses similar to those elicited by resistance training. We’ll review the possible benefits for clinical and sports populations.

Myofascial / Ischemic Compression: We will identify and treat trigger points of myofascial origin by ischemic or myofascial compression among patients with low back pain. Thumb pressure is used for the identification, localization and treatment of trigger points and tender spots within the muscles of the lumbar, pelvic, femoral and gluteal areas. The management of low back pain of myofascial origin by ischemic compression can be used in any setting, without the need of specialized equipment. In addition to clinical effectiveness within a wide range of safety, this approach is easy on the practitioner, effective in reducing tenderness, and well tolerated by the patient. Ischemic Compression uses the same or different trigger points so a resurgence of local blood flow will occur upon release. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ischemic_compression – cite_note-1 Ischemic compression is commonly applied to trigger points, where enough sustained pressure is applied to a trigger point with a tolerable amount of pain, and as discomfort is reduced, additional pressure is gradually given.

Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) Stretching techniques are commonly used in the athletic and clinical environments to enhance both active and passive range of motion (ROM) to optimize motor performance and rehabilitation. PNF Stretching is the most effective stretching technique when the aim is to increase ROM, particularly in respect to short-term changes in ROM. The superior changes in ROM that PNF Stretching often produces compared with other stretching techniques are usually attributed to autogenic and/or reciprocal inhibition.  The PNF Stretch technique will be demonstrated in UE and LE application.

 

Slow Motion Walking (SMW): Many people can ride a bike without falling over, yet only a very few can sit on an unmoving bike and say the same. Why? Because continuous forward movement can mask a myriad of balance deficiencies. Just as cycling involves superfast corrections to a thousand invisible almost-falls, walking with a body weakened by modern living results in one controlled fall after another. How do we find these controlled falls? You can identify any muscles that are “helping” when they shouldn’t be and others that aren’t doing their job. The muscle patterns we develop to cope with a balance exercise reappear when we actually need to balance.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)    Experience LMT for shoulder/neck issues, as well as hip/back issues.

2)    Follow a simple shoulder assessment.

3)    Review simple self-applied muscle tissue tone restoration examples.

4)    Identify stretching exercises for the shoulder.

5)    Practice a corrective technique using exercises focusing on deep tissue muscles.

2314 – Hip/Knee/Shoulder Progressions and Modifications

Intermediate / 3-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Ruth Sova, MS, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

We get stuck in a rut using the same exercises for almost all patients but what can we do? There are only a finite number of moves the body can perform. This workshop will help anyone with a heavy patient load especially if working with varied abilities and issues. The SCRAMBLED acronym will be taught, which makes the work easy. It’s simple to apply while writing or creating a protocol, for poolside when looking for a modification or progression, or for working groups at different levels.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)  Create progressions, variety and modifications in exercises and protocols

2)  Expand your exercise toolbox

3)  Always have a new or alternative exercise for your clients at your fingertips

4)  Explain the SCRAMBLED Concept

2315 – Vertical and Seated Hip and Back Protocols

Intermediate / 3-hour Workshop

Faculty: Ruth Sova, MS, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Clients sometimes rely on you to achieve their pain-free time. This session will give you therapeutic exercises clients can do on their own during your sessions with them, or independently as homework or after they’ve been released from therapy. We’ll review six basic soft tissue hip and back issues, experiment in the pool, and go over the handout and supplementary materials.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1) Assess client on several issues vital to effective and safe movement.

2) Review common issues that clients with hip or back pain, surgery or injury experience.

3) Experiment with Feldenkrais®, the breath, Ai Chi postures, BackHab strides and seated Pilates, PNF, UCT and Burdenko exercises to achieve repatterning in a safe way.

2318 – Hip and Back Specialty Certificate Program

Intermediate / 15-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Ruth Sova, MS, ATRIC / Maryanne Haggerty, MS

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The Hip and Back Specialty Certificate Program focuses on practical application for relearning functional movement patterns with carryover to activities of daily living. We often get stuck in a rut using the same exercises for almost all hip and back patients. This course will help anyone with a heavy patient load, especially if working with varied abilities and issues. Use the ideas from this course while writing or creating a protocol, for poolside when looking for an exercise, modification or progression, or for working groups at different levels.

This course will focus on:

Soft Tissue Issues:  We’ll review six basic soft tissue hip and back issues, experiment in the pool, and go over a sample protocol. The pool experience will follow a format of first decreasing pain and anxiety with evidence-based breath exercises, then warming up the hip and back musculoskeletal system with a squat combo, followed by performing exercises for deep tissue muscle re-education, stabilization, and function. We will use open and closed chain stabilization exercises that will also involve hip and back mobility.

A Total Kinetic Chain Approach:  We will integrate the entire kinetic chain for optimal performance of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems to create neuromuscular efficiency. In this segment of the course we will focus on unblocking the neural pathways for arthokinematic, muscular effectiveness and total body function. Using all three dimensions with sagittal, coronal, and transverse movement will improve our hip and back conditioning.

Modifications and Progressions:  We will review and experience several simple techniques for exercise modifications to allow for varied abilities to perform the same exercise. Progressions are included to further challenge qualities such as balance, coordination, endurance, trunk stability and gait. We will create modifications and progressions using speed variations, inertial drag, action/reaction, acceleration, turbulence, and form drag concepts.

The Heavy Concept:  The Heavy Concept offers a simple approach to neuromuscular retraining from the inside out. The Heavy Concept can help to restore neuromuscular timing, balance and control, and promote normal musculoskeletal biomechanicsIt can improve functional movement organization by re-educating neuromuscular patterns of the trunk by increasing efficiency and effectiveness. With the Heavy Concept the activation of the trunk muscles precedes firing of the hip and leg muscles. Proper timing of these muscles is an important factor in recovery from and prevention of injury.

Exercises for Hip, Back and Knee:  Clients sometimes rely on you to achieve their pain-free time. We will give you at least 30 therapeutic exercises clients can perform during your sessions with them, or independently as homework or after they’ve been released from therapy. Experiment with Feldenkrais®, the breath, Ai Chi postures, BackHab strides and seated Pilates, PNF, UCT and Burdenko exercises to achieve hip and back re-patterning in a safe way.

Equipment Selection and Use:  Exercises can be enhanced by using a variety of pieces of equipment.  Working with or on a piece of equipment helps an individual strengthen core muscles, as well as develop kinesthetic and proprioceptive abilities. As we try specific activities for hip and back function, we will discover how to design equipment-based progressions for clients of any age or function. This segment will also assist you in making choices for designing aquatic exercises with equipment that makes the transition to land-based exercise easier. Using equipment that allows concentric and eccentric contractions, plus the additional properties of the water will produce a better than smooth transition to land.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • Assess client on several issues vital to effective and safe movement.
  • Review common issues that clients with hip or back pain, surgery or injury experience.
  • Recruit the neuromuscular system in an efficient, effective plan.
  • Consider the concepts of integration.
  • Differentiate between progressions for balance, coordination, endurance, muscular strength, etc.
  • Experience continuous, graded resistance.
  • Follow logical progressions based on goals.
  • Create progressions using speed, core activation, repetition variations, UE involvement, turbulence, lever length and elevation.
  • Analyze the body efforts used to move proximal to distal – or from inner core muscles to outer core muscles.
  • Experience movement initiated in the core rather than in the extremities while feeling deep tissue trunk and abdominal muscles engage.
  • Expand your exercise toolbox.
  • Always have a new or alternative exercise for your clients at your fingertips.
  • Compare goals for each exercise.
  • Analyze and practice stride length, width, swing and roll.
  • Expand therapeutic tools to integrate muscular endurance and strength, balance, coordination, trunk stability, and gait training.
  • Evaluate and identify equipment that allows for force couples, concentric and eccentric contractions in the water.
  • Compare the types of equipment that allow for forced couples to help transition a person to the land directly.
  • Identify benefits to using equipment in the pool and the need for guided instruction for safe and effective use.
  • Explore how aquatic equipment can be used to directly transition a person from pool to land-based muscular endurance and strength training.
2319 – Total Joint Replacement Specialty Certificate Program

Intermediate / 15-Hour Program

 

Faculty: Beth Scalone, PT, DPT, OCS / Terri Mitchell, BA, PTA, ATRIC

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, more than one million total joint replacement surgeries are performed annually in the United States. Patients leave the hospital sooner and expect to return to an active lifestyle. This course will review current surgical procedures relating post-operative precautions, protocols and healing time-frame for total shoulder arthoplasty, total hip arthoplasty and total knee arthroplasty. New procedures such as “minimally invasive” hip replacements, resurfacing and hemiarthroplasty will be included.   

 

The aquatic environment is ideal throughout the stages of rehabilitation however, delaying aquatic therapy often occurs for fear of infection or poor wound healing. The pros and cons for early initiation of aquatic therapy, along with safe techniques for the application of waterproof dressings will be presented. This course integrates current evidence-based research with the practical clinical “pearls” for rehabilitation of total joint replacement surgery. Manual techniques for improving ROM, progression of therapeutic exercise to improve gait, balance and return to function will be the focus of pool lab portion of the course.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)  Describe post-surgical precautions in individuals who have undergone joint replacement surgery for hip, knee or shoulder joints.

2)  Safely cue and progress aquatic exercise for individuals post total joint replacement surgery.

3)  Discuss current research related to aquatic therapy and total joint replacement rehabilitation.

4)  Develop aquatic exercise strategies to facilitate gait and balance for individuals post-total joint replacement.

5)  Perform techniques to safely improve joint mobility in the “stiff” post-op knee.

6)  Describe proper application of tegaderm™/ waterproof dressing.

2321 – Knees: Prehab and Rehab

Intermediate / 3-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Lynda Huey, MS

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

Try everything before having knee surgery, and trying the pool is the best idea of all. Prevent or delay total knee surgery by as much as ten years in deep water with no impact. Prevent lateral release surgery by correctly strengthening the muscles around the knee in chest-deep water with mild impact. Prevent surgery for a torn meniscus with a combo of deep and shallow water exercises. Latest research shows no significant difference in patients’ outcomes if they have arthroscopy or do physical therapy. Let’s keep our people out of the operating room with this pool protocol.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)  Explain the concept of increasing range of motion and reducing pain in the OA patient to prevent or delay total knee surgery.

2)  Show how to strengthen the VMO to improve knee stability and prevent lateral release surgery.

3)  Review the types of meniscus tears that can heal with this program and the one type that cannot.

4)  Explain the theory behind turning the “blister” on the meniscus into a “callus.”

5)  Demonstrate a straight-leg program that allows the injured person to start pool exercises even with intense knee pain.

6)  Go through the step-by-step progression that safely moves people to healthy, functioning knees.

7)  Demonstrate the high-level program for a participant’s last day in the pool.

2323 – The Heavy Concept: Neuromuscular Retraining for Orthopedic Issues

Intermediate / 3-hour Land Workshop

Faculty:  Ruth Sova, MS, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

One of the main effects of injury is the loss of neuromuscular timing, balance, and control leading to loss of skill and function.  The Heavy Concept can help to restore these factors and promote normal musculoskeletal biomechanics.  It can improve functional movement organization by re-educating neuromuscular patterns of the trunk, pelvis and shoulder girdle by simply thinking ‘heavy’ while moving.

This allows the participant to initiate movement from the pelvis and trunk, encouraging proper biomechanics and coordination of extremity movements.  The majority of activities of daily living (and sports related movements) should be proximal to distal. The Heavy Concept creates whole-body synergy by linking pelvis, abdominal, spinal, and scapular muscle control with extremity movement.

 

This technique spans land and water. It can be used in all body positions and all musculoskeletal movements.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)   Analyze the body efforts used to move proximal to distal – or from inner core muscles to outer core muscles.

2)   Experience movement initiated in the core rather than in the extremities.

3)   Feel deep tissue trunk and abdominal muscles engage for balance and stability.

4)   Recruit muscle tissue in an efficient, effective progression.

5)   Discover a solid base for balance and safe movement.

6)   Observe how to trigger deep tissue muscles prior to extremity musculature firing.

2324 – Rehab for Hip Implants, Arthroscopy and Labral Repair

Intermediate / 8-hour Workshop

Faculty: Lynda Huey, MS

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: A comprehensive update on the latest information from top orthopedic surgeons at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center regarding hip implant surgery and hip arthroscopy. This update is necessary because the landscape for treating hips has changed dramatically since Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) was first codified by Swiss surgeons in 2003. Now there is a whole new sub-category of hip diagnoses that didn’t previously exist. Those who work with clients or patients in the pool need to understand the overview as well as the specifics. The intricate work inside the joint must be protected with new movement restrictions for hip arthroscopy patients.

Implant surgeries have changed in many dramatic ways, too, making it possible for patients to bypass the recovery room and go straight to their room where physical therapists await them to start gait training. Take a look at the latest changes in operative techniques that allow this to be possible. Discuss new options for anesthesia, the smaller incisions, and the various surgical approaches to the hip.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)  Explore the latest information from top surgeons regarding criteria to be a candidate for arthroscopy and the conditions that preclude candidacy.

2)  Study intra-operative photos and drawings to be able to identify the three types of FAI.

3)  Determine the basic movement restrictions following labral repair and bone removal to protect the new repair. Be able to construct a protocol within those limitations.

4)  In the pool, perform the basic rehab exercises followed by the modifications necessary for post-op FAI patients.

5)  Examine the timeline for progressing patients for either FAI or implant surgery.

6)  Apply the day’s understandings. Be able to provide examples of what to do at each phase of post-surgical recovery.

2326 – COREssentials for Hips

Intermediate / 3-hour Land Workshop with Application to Land and Water

 

Faculty: Laurie Denomme, B. Kinesiology

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The hips have the capacity to control and influence successful function of the body.  To best serve the shoulders, knees, and core, this ball and socket joint requires the ability to move in all three planes of motion. Having sufficient mobility will make improved strength possible using exercises that synergistically load the muscles surrounding the hip. Learn how to best achieve hip mobile stability plus take a closer look at how the femur and pelvis move relative to one another to reveal an extensive repertoire of exercise options.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)  Identify the six motions critical for healthy hip function.

2)  Describe the importance of why mobility is necessary to improve hip stability.

3)  Demonstrate how to synergistically load the muscles of the hip for improved function.

4)  Select better exercises using the understanding of five ways to get relative hip rotation.

5)  Utilize buoyancy and resistance to develop functional aquatic exercise progressions.

2327 - Optimal Techniques for the Neck and Shoulder - NEW!

Intermediate / 3.0 credit hours

(Pool Viewing Time: 90 minutes / Classroom Viewing Time: 90 minutes)

Faculty: Beth Scalone, PT, DPT, OCS, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The upper quadrant includes the neck, shoulder, arm, hand and thoracic spine. As humans we rely on our hands for essential activities of daily living. Pain, loss of motion or loss of strength anywhere along the upper limb chain can lead to significant loss in function. Successful management of this complex region requires first, that the aquatic therapist identify dysfunction and second, apply a variety of aquatic therapy techniques to address the client’s specific impairments.

This course will examine the functional connections between components of the region, discuss common diagnoses, review precautions and contraindications for specific diagnoses as they relate to aquatic therapy and present current research regarding treatment to the upper quadrant. Lecture time will present clinical pearls and current evidence in respect to neck pain and variety of upper extremity diagnoses. The primary focus of the pool lab portion of this course will be practical, hands-on aquatic manual techniques and aquatic therapy exercise progressions to improve ROM, strength and postural awareness. 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • Link five basic rehabilitation goals for upper quadrant impairments (decrease pain, reduce muscle tension, increase mobility, improve muscle balance, and restore postural awareness) with appropriate aquatic therapy interventions.
  • State precautions to treatment for upper quadrant diagnoses and list red flag symptoms or signs requiring referral to physician.
  • Cue client through water exercises to improve posture, increase upper quadrant strength and decrease stress/tension in the cervical muscles.
  • Perform safe and effective manual techniques to achieve specific rehabilitation goals for individuals with upper quadrant dysfunction.

FACULTY: Beth Scalone, PT, DPT, OCS, ATRIC, is a licensed physical therapist with many years of experience in orthopedic and aquatic therapy. As the owner of North County Water and Sports Therapy Center in San Diego (www.waterpt.com), she continues with hands-on clinical care in addition to her role as educator. Since graduating from the University of Connecticut in 1991, Beth has belonged to the American Physical Therapy Association and has achieved certification as a Clinical Specialist in Orthopedic Physical Therapy. In January 2006, she graduated from Boston University with a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree. Additional certifications include Certified STOTT Pilates™ instructor and Master Instructor for the Burdenko Method.

Beth not only provides continuing education for health care professionals, she is an adjunct faculty in the San Diego Mesa College PTA program, teaching Orthopedic Rehabilitation and Introduction to Pathology courses. She also provides the learning module/instruction on aquatic therapy to the University of St. Augustine San Diego Campus DPT program. She is the recipient of the 2010 ATRI Tsunami Spirit Award and the 2012 ATRI Professional Award.

2330 – Neuro Cross Training for Ortho Patients

Intermediate / 7-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Beth Scalone, PT, DPT, OCS, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

We often classify patients into two main categories: those with orthopedic diagnoses and those with neurological impairments. However, all of our clients have nerves and a central nervous system. Incorporating facilitation techniques, variations to exercise parameters and brain games is an easy and effective way to improve outcomes. This course presents neurological cross training techniques to optimize rehabilitation and facilitate neurogenesis for those patients with orthopedic issues.

A combination of clinical pearls and current research are presented to assist the aquatic therapist in choosing from a variety of techniques to enhance rehabilitation programs for individuals across the lifespan. These techniques assist in improving strength, balance, coordination, agility, motor planning and pain modulation. The pool lab will focus on practical applications of these techniques with common aquatic exercise used in the treatment of orthopedic clients.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)  Explore latest research in respect to neurogenesis and rehabilitation strategies.

2)  List at least four different ways to cue exercise to improve motor performance.

3)  Incorporate mental tasks with physical activity to improve motor control.

4)  Describe pain modulation strategies to reduce central sensitization.

5)  Modify and apply various techniques to aquatic exercise with the goal of neurogenesis and improved function.

2331 – LE and Trunk using Barre Concepts - NEW!

Intermediate / 3.0 credit hours
(Classroom Viewing Time: 1:30-3:00 pm / Pool Viewing Time: 3:00-4:30 pm)

Faculty: Anne Pringle Burnell, AS

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Learn techniques from yoga, dance, and Pilates to strengthen the lower extremities and hips, and stabilize the torso against the movements of limbs. Using dance-based exercises, stretches on the “barre” (noodle), Pilates footwork, and plyometrics, the lower extremities can be conditioned for agility, flexibility and power. This course uses the mind/body component of breath with movement, dynamic stretches, and exercises from the Cadillac/Trapeze Pilates repertoire.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
1) Determine two stances for the Mermaid, and how they differ.
2) Identify a trunk stabilization exercise in flexion, extension, and neutral.
3) Examine the LE water ballet stretch sequences for hip mobility based on Pilates Cadillac/Trapeze series.
4) Explore a Pilates Method for a safe landing phase in plyometric footwork.

FACULTY: Anne Pringle Burnell, AS, created the Peyow® Aqua Pilates program and the Stronger Seniors® Workout Program. She is an education provider and certified by: AEA, ACE, AFAA and Stott Pilates™. She teaches at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Peninsula Spa, University of Illinois Chicago, and has been a presenter at conferences including the National Council on Aging/ASA 2010 Joint Conference.

2614 – Ortho and Neuro Applications for PNF
Intermediate / 3-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Terri Mitchell, BA, PTA, ATRIC

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: PNF is the perfect solution for deficits in balance, coordination, strength, and range of motion. Review the concepts of PNF and apply the spiral diagonal patterns to ortho and neuro patients. Specific applications will be provided for persons with Parkinson’s, CVA, Fibromyalgia, Multiple Sclerosis, post-mastectomy and total knee replacement. PNF will be applied in vertical, prone and supine positions in the pool. Experience the exceptional results of PNF in the pool in small group and one-on-one applications.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • Review the fundamentals of PNF movement patterns for the upper and lower extremities.
  • Determine how to maximize the benefits of PNF in the aquatic environment.
  • Outline common deficits of Parkinson’s, post-mastectomy, CVA, Fibromyalgia, MS, and TKR.
  • Identify how to use PNF patterns to improve balance, coordination and range of motion.
  • Examine specific PNF solutions for these special populations and how to overcome common obstacles to progression.
2619 – Upper Quarter Connections and Aquatic Therapy Progressions

Intermediate / 3-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Beth Scalone, PT, DPT, OCS, ATRIC

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: It is impossible to treat the shoulder in isolation. The cervical and thoracic spine influence the shoulder girdle and often injuries and symptoms at the elbow and wrist can be associated with proximal impairments. This workshop will present evidence-based medicine on upper quarter connections with exercise focusing on progressions from increasing mobility to improving stability and strength ending with functional integration. Although orthopedic diagnoses are the primary concentration for case examples and clinical pearls presented, the exercises can be applied to neurologically impaired and general conditioning clients.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)  Describe biomechanical relationships of the upper quarter.

2)  Perform manual stretching and techniques in the water to improve flexibility of the upper quarter.

3)  Design, cue and progress upper quadrant strengthening aquatic exercise.

4)  Incorporate purposeful integration type activities in the aquatic exercise program to maximize functional recovery.

5)  State precautions to specific orthopedic upper limb diagnoses especially as they relate to aquatic exercise.

2620 – 25 Cervical Aquatic Therapy Maneuvers

Intermediate / 4-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Beth Scalone, PT, DPT, OCS

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This is a special aquatic therapy program to treat cervical orthopedic problems, including both acute and chronic neck pain. Review of pathology, anatomy and special tests along with evaluation and goal setting will be discussed in the lecture. The lab portion will link at least 25 aquatic therapy maneuvers to specific rehabilitation goals. The maneuvers include traction, rib cage mobilization, stretching, massage, neural glides and exercise. Lecture will include land-based home exercise to complement aquatic program when possible.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Link five basic rehabilitation goals for cervical spine dysfunction (decrease pain, reduce muscle tension, increase mobility, improve muscle balance, and restore postural awareness) with aquatic therapy interventions.
  2. List red flag symptoms or signs requiring referral to physician.
  3. Describe common postural deviations and muscle firing patterns found in individuals with chronic neck pain.
  4. Cue client through water exercises to improve posture, increase upper quadrant strength and decrease stress/ tension in the cervical muscles.
  5. Perform manual techniques for the cervical spine to achieve specific rehabilitation goals.
3300 – Thoracic Spine: The Missing Link to Function

Advanced / 7-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Beth Scalone, PT, DPT, OCS, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The thoracic spine is often overlooked in rehabilitation. As the link between the cervical spine and trunk, and the shoulder and the trunk, it plays a vital role in the function of the upper quadrant. As the connection of the lumbar spine to the trunk with muscle and fascial connections to the pelvis, the thoracic spine is involved in energy transfer from the lower body to the upper body in activities such as pushing, pulling, lifting and throwing. It could be argued that rehabilitation programs for all individuals regardless of diagnosis should address the thoracic spine.

This course will review the anatomy, biomechanics and connections of the thoracic spine as they relate to function. Lecture will discuss current research and common diagnoses related to the thoracic spine. Research combined with clinical pearls are linked to aquatic rehabilitation techniques with the goals of restoring mobility, improving strength, correcting postural alignment and return to function. The pool lab portion will allow the participant to practice these techniques along with experiencing progressions for functional integrative exercise for individuals of all ages and abilities.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1)  Explore current research relating thoracic spine mobility influences on neck, shoulder and lumbar spine function.

2)  Progress and cue clients in aquatic based exercises to restore and maintain thoracic spine mobility and strength.

3)  Describe the connection between the thoracic spine and rib cage.

4)  State precautions and contraindications related to thoracic spine diagnoses.

5)  Recognize key aspects to rehabilitation of common diagnoses involving the thoracic spine (scoliosis, spondylitis, T4 syndrome, thoracic outlet, compression fracture, postural related pain).

6)  Perform manual aquatic techniques to restore mobility of thoracic spine.

3303 - Advanced Lumbar Stabilization Applying the Burdenko Method

Advanced / 8-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Beth Scalone, PT, DPT, OCS

 

Participants should have basic knowledge of aquatic principles and anatomy, however no prior experience of theBurdenko method required.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course will introduce the basic principles of the Burdenko Method with the focus on lumbar stabilization exercises. Progression of exercise from rehabilitation to post-rehab conditioning to sport-training level will be presented. The unique combination of land and water exercises in this course will provide the attendee with the information needed to progress individuals from rehabilitation to conditioning to training. This course will present a brief review of the functional anatomy related to lumbar spine with the majority of the time spent on specific exercises.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  1. Determine primary muscles that play a role in lumbar stabilization.
  2. Examine the 6 qualities of movement addressed in the Burdenko Method.
  3. Distinguish between local and global muscle function and control.
  4. Explore appropriate-level land and water exercises for clients.
  5. Determine equipment to facilitate or challenge pool stabilization exercise.
  6. Cue client in activation of local deep spine stabilizing muscles.
  7. Instruct client through levels of spinal stabilization aquatic exercise.
3304 – Aquatic Lumbopelvic Stabilization Protocol

Advanced / 3-hour Workshop

 

Faculty:  Luis G. Vargas, PhD, PT, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The structure and clinical applications of the four stages of the Aquatic Lumbopelvic Stabilization Protocol will be presented in theory and practiced in the pool session. The anatomy and biomechanics of the lumbopelvic complex will be discussed.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1) Describe the biomechanics of the lumbopelvic complex.

2) Identify the anatomical structures that provide support and stability to the lumbopelvic complex.

3) Explore the structure and stages of the ALS Protocol.

4) Selectively apply the various stages and activities featured in the ALS Protocol given the patient’s clinical diagnosis.

3306 - Corrective and Functional Low Back Exercises - NEW!

Advanced / 8.0 credit hours

Pool Viewing Time: 2 hours

Classroom Viewing Time: 1.5 hours

Pool Viewing Time: 2 hours

Classroom Viewing Time: 2.5 hours 

Faculty: Beth Scalone, PT, DPT, OCS, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

(Please note: This course has been updated with new material.)

Lower back pain is one of the most common complaints in the adult population. Often muscle imbalance and poor mechanics are present before the person reports pain. The aquatic environment provides an ideal environment to correct these imbalances, reduce pain and progress functional strengthening. This course will present common movement impairments found with lower back dysfunction and provide aquatic exercise progressions to restore muscle imbalance and function.

Lecture will focus on recognizing/ diagnosing movement dysfunction, best research and clinical pearls to assist the aquatic therapist in clinical reasoning to develop an effective aquatic, rehabilitative exercise program.  The pool lab portion will concentrate on facilitating ideal movement to correct impairments including techniques to relax and stretch tight muscles combined with exercise progressions challenging all three planes of movement to strengthen and restore function.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

  • Describe at least four common movement impairments seen in people with lower back dysfunction and/or pain.
  • Incorporate current research to clinical application decisions when designing aquatic exercise for individuals with lower back dysfunction and/or pain.
  • Apply manual release and stretch techniques to various muscles known to be overactive in lower back dysfunction including hamstrings, hip flexors, quadratus lumborum and lumbar paraspinals.
  • Instruct, cue and progress aquatic exercise for correction of movement dysfunction in all three planes for individuals with lower back dysfunction and/or pain.

FACULTY: Beth Scalone, PT, DPT, OCS, ATRIC, is a licensed physical therapist with many years of experience in orthopedic and aquatic therapy. As the owner of North County Water and Sports Therapy Center in San Diego (www.waterpt.com), she continues with hands-on clinical care in addition to her role as educator. Since graduating from the University of Connecticut in 1991, Beth has belonged to the American Physical Therapy Association and has achieved certification as a Clinical Specialist in Orthopedic Physical Therapy. In January 2006, she graduated from Boston University with a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree. Additional certifications include Certified STOTT Pilates™ instructor and Master Instructor for the Burdenko Method.

Beth not only provides continuing education for health care professionals, she is an adjunct faculty in the San Diego Mesa College PTA program, teaching Orthopedic Rehabilitation and Introduction to Pathology courses. She also provides the learning module/instruction on aquatic therapy to the University of St. Augustine San Diego Campus DPT program. She is the recipient of the 2010 ATRI Tsunami Spirit Award and the 2012 ATRI Professional Award.

3309 – Upper Quadrant Techniques

Advanced / 4-hour Workshop

 

Faculty: Terri Mitchell, BA, PTA, ATRIC

COURSE DESCRIPTION: 

The upper quadrant is complex. Successful management of identifying dysfunction from the neck to the hand, and then treating the region with various aquatic therapy techniques requires a hands-on approach. From passive activities to manual techniques to AquastretchTM to active exercise, learn how to treat common orthopedic problems including shoulder impingement, frozen shoulder, scapula-thoracic dysfunction, or epicondylitis. This hands-on course is presented in a practical manner.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1) Practice hands on AquaStretchTM techniques in vertical positions for release of connective tissue in cervical and upper extremity fascia.
2) Experience supine position manual aquatic therapy techniques such as PNF, Bad Ragaz, massage, joint mobs and distraction.
3) Create therapeutic aquatic exercise programs/protocols for upper quadrant diagnoses including cervical pain, shoulder impingement, epicondylitis, and more.
4) Examine case studies of the upper quadrant.